Home » Short Stories by Leo Tolstoy: The Death of Ivan Ilyich, What Men Live By, the Kreutzer Sonata, How Much Land Does a Man Need? by Books LLC
 About the Book 

This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Death of Ivan Ilyich, What Men Live By, the Kreutzer Sonata, HowMoreThis is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: The Death of Ivan Ilyich, What Men Live By, the Kreutzer Sonata, How Much Land Does a Man Need?, God Sees the Truth, but Waits, the Devil, the Forged Coupon, Quench the Spark, Promoting a Devil, Father Sergius, the Three Questions, the Grain, the Snowstorm, Too Dear , Work, Death, and Sickness, Wisdom of Children, Croesus and Fate, Repentance, Kholstomer, Ivan the Fool, Master and Man, the Big Oven, Three Deaths, Where Love Is, God Is. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Russian:, Smert Ivana Ilyicha), first published in 1886, is a novella by Leo Tolstoy, one of the masterpieces of his late fiction, written shortly after his religious conversion of the late 1870s. The novel tells the story of the life and death, at the age of 45, of a high-court judge in 19th-century Russiaa miserable husband, proud father, and upwardly-mobile member of Russias professional class, the object of Tolstoys unremitting satire. Living what seems to be a good life, his dreadful relationship with his wife notwithstanding, Ivan Ilyich Golovin bangs his side while putting up curtains in a new apartment intended to reflect his familys superior status in society. Within weeks, he has developed a strange taste in his mouth and a pain that will not go away. Numerous expensive doctorsfriends of friends of friendsare visited in their surgeries or called to the judges bedside, but beyond muttering about blind gut and floating kidneys, they can neither explain nor treat his condition, and it soon becomes clear that Ivan Ilyich is dying. The second half of the novel records his terror as he battles with the idea of his own death. I have been here. Now I am going there. Where? ... No, I wont have it Oppressed by the le...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=1453348